Organic Garden Landscape Design and Installation

1. What is Organic Garden Landscape Design & Installation?

Perhaps inspired by President Obama’s organic garden on the grounds of the White House, many homeowners are becoming interested in growing their own food through gardening.  The National Gardening Association (NGA) reported a 19% increase in do-it-yourself gardens this year, and fully 1 out of every 5 respondent to a telephone interview said they planned to start a garden in the coming year.  The NGA also reported that interest in using organics around the house, where chemical exposure is so closely tied to the family (and family pet)’s health, has surged in recent years.  From 2004 to 2008, the number of households estimated to be using only non-toxic fertilizer, pest control and weed control methods has risen from 5 million to 12 million.

But many Americans don’t have the know-how or the time to do the actual work.  As a result, there is growing demand for skilled contractors to design, install, and maintain organic gardens and help people grow their own food, reduce their carbon footprint, and improve the health of their diets.

2. What required knowledge or skills are necessary?

Many colleges and universities have degrees in landscape design, and larger scale jobs will be very challenging if you do not have such a degree.  However, small-scale jobs for homeowners interested in a small garden can be performed without such formal education.  It is strenuous work and requires you to be able to lift up to 50 pounds, work outdoors in a wide variety of climatic conditions, and be skilled enough in creating and managing irrigation equipment to keep your gardens alive and productive.  Ongoing maintenance of these jobs, should you choose to make that part of the business plan, will require you to be organized, skilled in organic soil fertility methods and non-toxic pest control.

3. How much money is required to start?

$-$$   (on a scale of $ to $$$$$)

4. What is the income potential?

$$$   (on a scale of $ to $$$$$)

5. What is the best location for an organic garden and landscape business?

The location in which you start this business is irrelevant, so long as you and your equipment are mobile and can get to your customers’ locations.

6.  Three best questions to ask yourself to find out if this business is right for you (if you can answer yes to all three, this business might be for you):

Have you always been told you have a ‘green thumb’?
If you live in a place with a cold climate, this work does not continue through the winter…is that OK with you?
Do you enjoy manual labor, working with your hands, and the ongoing need for maintenance of your work?

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Interested in starting one in your community? Where do you begin?  What permits do you need?  Who is your target customer?  How do you find them?  What is the best use of your limited advertising dollars?  What’s the best way to attract a great employee or volunteer?  What does an average day look like?  What strategic tips do veteran eco-entrepreneurs suggest for startups like you?

There’s a lot to think about.  Rest easy.  Our mission is to help you succeed, so drop us a line (Info@GreenBusinessVillage.com).  We’ll get you a business planning document to get you on your way for ONLY $199!  We also guarantee our work, so if you are not satisfied, you get your money back!*

Take a look at a sample table of contents and a few sample excerpts from similar plans here.   In essence, we’ll provide you the What, When, Where, and How…you provide the Who!

Info@GreenBusinessVillage.com

*Subject to the terms of our Licensing Agreement.

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